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Our Abductors Were Fulani From Sudan, Mali, They Are Likely Behind Beheading Of People In South-East – Methodist Prelate, Kanu-Uche

Posted by Thandiubani on Thu 02nd Jun, 2022 - tori.ng

Kanu-Uche, in an interview with AriseTV on Thursday, said he was beginning to suspect that killings in Igboland were not from Igbos but Fulani herdsmen.

Kanu-Uche
 
The Prelate, Methodist Church of Nigeria, Dr Samuel Kanu-Uche has spoken about his abductors.
 
According to him, he was not kidnapped by members of the Indigenous People of Biafra.
 
Kanu-Uche stated that his kidnappers confessed that they were foreigners from other African countries.
 
The prelate noted that the abductors told him and the other clerics that they were Fulani from Sudan, Mali and Sungai who have been living in Igbo land for a very time and had integrated into the communities and hardly could they be differentiated from the Igbo.
 
Kanu-Uche, in an interview with AriseTV on Thursday, said he was beginning to suspect that killings in Igboland were not from Igbos but Fulani herdsmen.
 
“He (the kidnapper) said he was a Fulani from Sudan that about five of them were Fulani from Sudan; about two of them there were from Mali and one of them was from Sungai, but that they have lived in Nigeria for many years. So, I spoke to my bishop, the Fulani then spoke in Igbo that he lives in Umuahia, play football in Umuahia and his parents lived in Umuahia and his father was a cow dealer – a herdsmen but unfortunately the parents died leaving him and his siblings and that he’s the one fending for his siblings.
 
“What they did to me had nothing to do with IPOB; it was pure kidnapping by Fulani herdsmen because their cattle were very close and manned by some people that have nothing to do with IPOB and I’m beginning to suspect that these are the people who cut off people’s heads; they are not clearly Igbos, Igbos are not known for cutting people’s heads but they are Fulani children, born in Igbo land.
 
“You can’t differentiate them; they went to school here, their parents were big men cattle dealers, their mothers used to fry ‘akara’ we bought when we were young; so they grew up here and integrated themselves into the society.”
 


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